Relationship between perceived self-reported trust in health information sources and ocular fixation in a sam-ple of young adults: a secondary data analysis.

  • Livia Livint Popa RoNeuro Institute for Neurological Research and Diagnostic
  • Ovidiu Selejan RoNeuro Institute for Neurological Research and Diagnostic
  • Stefan Strilciuc RoNeuro Institute for Neurological Research and Diagnostic
  • Olivia Verisezan Rosu RoNeuro Institute for Neurological Research and Diagnostic
  • Maria Balea RoNeuro Institute for Neurological Research and Diagnostic
  • Fior Dafin Muresanu RoNeuro Institute for Neurological Research and Diagnostic
Keywords: eye movement tracking, ocular fixation, E-health, Trust analysis

Abstract

Introduction

We set out to explore the relationship between self-perceived trust and visual interaction with online information sources (websites), using eye tracking methods.

Methodology

The study is a secondary data analysis conducted on a snowball sample of 28 gender-balanced young adults with higher education degrees and intermediate or higher knowledge of English. We used a Pro T60XL monitor device to assess individual ocular reaction at 30-second exposure intervals to 20 health-related webpages.

Results

The websites received self-perceived trust marks ranging from 1 to 5 (mean=3.52, SD=0,422). A borderline strong statistically significant positive correlation (r=0.68, p=0.001) was found between logo fixations (LAOI) and self-reported trust rank. Websites that were ranked higher in terms of trust appear to be more likely to have a higher number of fixations on the logo. A moderate statistically significant positive correlation (r=0.526, p=0.017) was observed between fixations before the logo (FBL) and self-reported trust rank.

Discussion and conclusions

Measuring fixation is difficult to perform due to the heterogeneous character of experimental conditions. Graphic design elements (logos) are a main point of ocular focus and are associated with higher trust. Eye tracking shows promise as a tool for physiological assessment of behavioral patterns.

Published
2019-12-02
How to Cite
Livint Popa, L., Selejan, O., Strilciuc, S., Verisezan Rosu, O., Balea, M., & Muresanu, F. D. (2019). Relationship between perceived self-reported trust in health information sources and ocular fixation in a sam-ple of young adults: a secondary data analysis. ORBIT Journal, 2019(1). https://doi.org/10.29297/orbit.v2019i1.121